The Marche – a region awakes: Part 2 – the red wines

A few weeks ago I was on a wonderful trip to the Marche region of Italy, some of you will have read Part 1 of my thoughts on the trip, well here is Part 2 and it focuses on a couple of producers whose red wines really stood out for me.

Beautiful vineyards in the Marche.

I saw so much that excited me on my trip to the Marche, it is a beautiful landscape with much to enjoy and incredible variety, borne out by the many different wine styles. However it is the quality of the DOC Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi whites and the lesser known, in the UK anyway, Cònero Rosso DOC and Cònero Riserva DOCG that must be the region’s vinous calling cards.

I was hugely impressed by the modern examples of Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi, they were totally different from the thin and harshly acidic wines of my youth.

In truth I had no idea what to expect from the reds, so really enjoyed the experiences of tasting the wines. They were so varied, from deliciously fruity and modern wines, to rich and powerful examples and refined elegant wines. It seems there is something for everyone here.

We tasted good red wines at pretty much every where we went, but these are the ones that moved me the most.

Wine map of the Marche – click for a larger view.

The main grape in the Marche for red wines is Montepulciano and the most important wine that it is used for is Rosso Cònero DOC and it’s big brother the Cònero Riserva DOCG. Both of these must contain at least 85% Montepulciano and can have up to 15% Sangiovese.

Montepulciano is a grape that struggles with its image I think. For a start there are the cheap and cheerful wines from Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. I know there are good wines made down there, but most of the examples that we get are somewhat jammy and easy drinking. Well most of the Rosso Cònero and Cònero Riserva wines that I tried were nothing like that. They were very enjoyable to drink, but they were layered and complex wines that really excited me.

The other problem for Montepulciano, which can cause confusion, is that in Tuscany there is a town of that name that produces a wine called Vino Nobile di Montepulciano from Sangiovese grapes.

I was really astonished by how good these Cònero wines were and very disappointed that are very hard to come by in the UK.

Cònero DOCG covers the same area, but has lower yields and is aged for at least 2 years.

Fattoria La Terrazze

Fattoria La Terrazze from the air showing the proximity to the sea – photo courtesy of the winery.

My second winery visit in the Marche was to Fattoria La Terrazze in the Rosso Cònero area. The setting is so lovely, 10 km or so to the south of Ancona and only a kilometre or so inland from the Adriatic Sea and Mount Conero which gives this small wine area its name. The mountain is a promontory to the south of Ancona (there is a slight bulge out into the sea on my map) and is the only high point on the east coast of Italy and at 572 metres it really stands out. In ancient times it must have been a welcoming marker to tell sailors that they had made it safely to Ancona.

Antonio Terni.

The estate has been here since 1882 and is still owned by the founding Terni family, although its reputation is all recent. Today it is run by Antonio Terni and his charming English wife Georgina. I liked them, their beautiful winery and all the wines. Antonio is something of a music fan and his rosé is rather memorably called ‘Pink Fluid’. We even tried his bulk wine that is sold to the locals by the litre – they bring their bottles and jars to be filled. The red was a Montepulciano and the white was a Chardonnay and they were very nice, drinkable wines, however, some of his finer products really stood out.

2014 Rosso Cònero
DOC Rosso Cònero
Fattoria La Terrazze

100% Montepulciano grapes are fermented in stainless steel and then aged in huge, 2000-4000 litres wooden barrels for 15 months.

The colour was a mixture of damson and dark cherry, while the nose gave off wild fruit of the forest and light smoke notes together with something a little salty or soy sauce-like. The palate is medium weight with nice acid balance, herbal flavours, salty, mineral and spicy flavours and some coulis like brambles fruit together with a very long finish. I liked this a lot. It was my first wine of the region that I can remember tasting and it was pretty impressive, a worthy alternative to Chianti or something like that – 89/100 points.

The road to Fattoria La Terrazze, that is Monte Cònero and the sea in the distance..

2013 Sassi Neri
DOCG Cònero Riserva
Fattoria La Terrazze

This wine is named after a beach below Monte Cònero which is called black or neri because it is covered in mussels.

This is also 100% Montepulciano grapes that are very carefully selected for this wine, picked later and riper are fermented in stainless steel and then aged in 225 litres wooden barrels for 18-24 months depending on the parcel of fruit. It is also aged for a further 6months in bottle before release.

The colour was attractive, deep, and plummy. The nose was earthy, smoky and savoury in a really attractive way. Then the palate was rich and intense with smoke, herbs, sweet liquorice, a sweet and sour umami thing, rich cooked dark fruit, spice and some pretty big, drying chalky tannins in a good way. My I liked this, it really is beautifully made  – 91/100 points.

Antonio also shared bottle of the 1998 Sassi Neri with us. This was much more developed with more prune-like fruit, fig notes, dried raspberry, as well as rich umami, coffee,muchroom and salty flavours on the lovely finish.

Some of the Fattoria La Terrazze wines are available in the UK from Tannico.co.uk and Italvinus.

Azienda Agricola Moroder

Aerial view of Azienda Agricola Moroder -photo courtesy of the winery.

Azienda Agricola Moroder is another winery in a magnificent setting. It’s in the middle of Conero National Park, just 5 km inland from the Adriatic Sea and the glorious Mount Conero which gives this small wine area its name.

Mattia and Marco Moroder.

The estate today is run by Marco and Mattia Moroder whose family have owned the site since the late eighteenth century, but who turned it into a dedicated winery in 1837. The winery is still in the cellar of the beautiful original farmhouse. The Moroder name is actually Ladin and Germanic and originates in the South Tyrol, indeed the brothers told us that Giorgio Moroder is a relative. They also explained that the name came from bands of fighting men who were left behind, making it strikingly similar to ‘marauder’ in English.

The cellar dates back to 1700 and was originally used as an ice store and to keep food in good condition. Although they have a long history here, their reputation is much more recent and Marco and Mattia’s parents, Alessandro and Serenella Moroder can pretty much be credited with revitalising the red wines of the area.

Azienda Agricola Moroder.

The estate has a huge terrace with beautiful views out over the vineyards making it seem very restful. It covers some 120 hectares, but only 50 are planted with vines. The rest being forest, olives and fruit trees, all of which helps with bio-diversity and other products like oil, jam and truffles. The brothers are keen to have a light impact on nature and since 2010 the estate has been certified organic.

Azienda Agricola Moroder.

We tasted a wide range of their wines, including a sparkling, but it was the reds of the Cònero Rosso DOC and Cònero Riserva DOCg that really got to me. All of these are made from 100% Montepulciano grapes.

They produce a comprehensive range too starting with two very different Cònero Rosso DOC. The fresh, unoaked Aiòn was a great start, but the botti aged Moroder Cònero Rosso was a real step up in complexity.

Botti in the cellar of Azienda Agricola Moroder.

2013 Rosso Cònero
DOC Rosso Cònero
Azienda Agricola Moroder

100% Montepulciano long macerated on the skins to give good colour and flavour, then aged for 24 months in botti, large barrels of 2700 litres.

The nose is lovely with one leafy notes, chocolate and ripe red fruit. The palate is beautifully structured with delicate oak, ripe fruit and tamed tannins. There is plenty of fruit with earthy and mineral flavours. I loved this wine and think many others would too if we could just buy it – 89/100 points.

2004 Rosso Cònero
DOC Rosso Cònero
Azienda Agricola Moroder

100% Montepulciano aged for 24 months in botti, large barrels of 2700 litres.

As you might expect this was much more developed than the 2013 version. The fruit had turned much more savoury, earthy and leathery with a meaty and tomato stem quality. It was a splendid wine, a bit of a treat really, but needed food. The younger, brighter wine was more for me – 89/100 points.

2012 Cònero Riserva
DOCG Cònero Riserva
Azienda Agricola Moroder

This is their standard Cònero Riserva DOCG, the grapes are carefully selected, with low yields and the wine is aged for 30 months in oak, half in 10,000 litre botti and the other 50% in barrels.

The nose is gorgeous, with lifted damsons, sweet cherry and smoky, coffee / mocha notes. The palate is full, smooth and rich with some intense dried fruit characters, fresh acidity and a lovely earthy, savoury character leading to a very long finish. I was hugely impressed by this wine, it was concentrated and intense, with lovely mineral, earthy notes and a wonderful backbone of fresh acidity – 90/100 points.

Azienda Agricola Moroder.

2011 Dorico
DOCG Cònero Riserva
Azienda Agricola Moroder

This is their top wine, a Cònero Riserva DOCg called Dorico in celebration of the Greeks who brought grape growing to the Italian peninsula. This cuvée is made by a very careful selection of the best fruit that is left on the vine for 2 extra weeks to get even riper. The wine is aged for 36 months in barriques, 225 litre barrels.

The nose is gorgeous, with lifted damsons, sweet cherry and smoky, coffee / mocha notes. The palate is full, smooth and rich with some intense dried fruit characters, fresh acidity and a lovely earthy, savoury character leading to a very long finish. I was hugely impressed by this wine, it was concentrated and intense, with lovely mineral, earthy notes and a wonderful backbone of fresh acidity. It was one of my two favourite reds of the trip, beautifully balanced with tension between the richness of the fruit and the grapes natural acidity and the minerality of the style. Again the tannins of this famously tannic grape were very well tamed – 93/100 points.

Some of the Moroder wines are available to be shipped to the UK – until Brexit ruins everything – by Uvinum.

Umani Ronchi

Massimo and Michele Bernetti.

Umani Ronchi is one of the really famous names from this part of Italy, but despite the scale on which they operate, everything of theirs that I tasted was very good indeed. The company was created and is still owned by the Bernetti family. Michele Bernetti is the CEO while his father Massimo is the chairman. It’s a pretty large estate run on several different sites as they produce Verdicchio wines and wines in neighbouring Abruzzo as well as in Cònero and all their vineyards are farmed organically.

Some of Umani Ronchi’s Cònero vineyards.

2016 Serrano
DOC Rosso Cònero
Umani Ronchi

85% Montepulciano with 15% Sangiovese fermented in stainless steel aged in stainless steel to preserve the juicy fruit.

Everything about this wine is fresh, juicy and lively. The colour is vibrant like liquified raspberry. The nose gives bright, fresh lively raspberry fruit together with a touch of herb and pepper. The palate is plump, chunky, smooth and supple with loads of bright, rich fruit and a light touch of chalky tannins on the finish. This is a happy wine that is very modern, very fruity and beautifully made – 89/100 points.

The Umani Ronchi barrel cellar in Cònero.

2011 Campo San Giorgio
DOCG Cònero Riserva
Umani Ronchi

100% Montepulciano grapes carefully selected from the San Giorgio vineyard which was planted around 2000 and is trained into bush vines in order to stress the plant and produce small yields. Everything is done by hand in this vineyard and everything is done to ensure a small crop of concentrated fruit. The grapes are fermented whole, but without the stalks, using the natural yeast to give a spontaneous fermentation. The wine is aged in new oak barriques for 12-14 months depending on the parcel the barrel. They only make around 4000 bottles of this wine. 

The ageing and the maturity really show here, it has an earthy, garnet colour. The nose delivers salty, tangy, earth,  sweet cherry and raspberry notes.
The palate is lovely and supple with a fresh, breezy feel, the oak makes it mocha infused and there is a wonderful concentration of fruit. All in all it has a lovely balance between lightness and richness. There are nice fine grain tannins on the finish, while the minerality and freshness give it great elegance. A very fine and very beautiful red wine – 94/100 points.

I also tasted the 2010 Campo San Giorgio which was also very good, but I thought the 2011 just had the edge – although I would happily drink either.

Some of the Umani Ronchi wines are available in the UK from Tannico.co.uk.

It does seem very strange to me that these are so rarely available in the UK. They deserve to be more widely seen here as the general quality seemed to be very high indeed. The style struck me as being very accessible and would prove popular with anyone who enjoys Chianti, Rioja or Bordeaux. There was nothing odd, rustic or quirky about these wines, they deserve to be widely known and enjoyed and not just treated as an obscure oddity. As you can see I liked some of these very much, the best of these red wines were as good as anything I have tasted this year.

I will leave it at that for now, but I have more to say about the wines of the Marche, some more producers and styles to mention, so will return to the region soon.

 

2 thoughts on “The Marche – a region awakes: Part 2 – the red wines

  1. Pingback: Australia’s wine dark sea | Quentin Sadler's Wine Page

  2. Pingback: Wine of the Week – a stylish Italian sparker | Quentin Sadler's Wine Page

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